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Comments

  • topmojosun

    topmojosun

    March 10, 2015, 11:40 pm

    You're assuming I'd be expecting a brick to be thrown in the Islamic house. You expecting a brick in mine lends me to believe that the thought crossed your mind at some point. Also assuming that I have a problem with Islam just because I'm a southerner, or perhaps just an american if you're foreign, is very narrow-minded of you. So to avoid not answering the question like you just did, I can think of no situation where I'd personally throw a brick through the window of somebody's house, or even support it.

    Reply

  • TheSadMan

    TheSadMan

    March 10, 2015, 10:19 pm

    My understanding is that medications like Paxil do limit emotional range. Did you have a fairly good control over your money before taking Paxil? Far be it from me to sound like a broken record, but you've done the right thing, talking to people (even if they aren't professionals). I think it's wonderful that you've found a something that you like doing; it'll help take your mind off things. I do believe it would be helpful to find other means to reduce your anxiety besides medications.

    I don't know if anyone has had good experiences with such drugs, but I don't want to sound like the Jenny McCarthy of anxiety meds.

    Reply

  • troller10

    troller10

    March 11, 2015, 2:22 am

    Because it is so difficult to accomplish anything by ones self, and communicating ones intentions inevitably leads to betrayal.

    Also, lets face it, we are not that bad off.

    Most of us have the following:

    Homes, cars, jobs, vacations, lots of food, entertainment, family, all the things that we should be fighting for we already have.

    Sure we get pissed off at the taxes we have to pay. But, it is usually someone else that gets falsely accused of a crime, or loses his/her home.

    As long as the majority of us are well fed, have a roof over our heads and are kept busy with, (what we think is), meaning full work, what is there to resist?

    Reply

  • d00ley

    d00ley

    March 11, 2015, 9:16 am

    > Most of your comment seems like a direct contradiction of when you said that the USPS doesn't use tax revenue.

    How so? I'm not arguing the point yet, however, I'm not completely understanding what you are seeing. Here's an imaginary example, that may or may not be relevant. Imagine that the US Gov. mandates that Fedex must charge certain customers a rate for services that is half of the cost to Fedex for providing those services. If the US Government then reimburses Fedex, twice a year, for the difference between the costs and revenue (losses) of following that mandate, would you consider that Fedex is being subsidized by taxpayer money? I would say no, they are simply be reimbursed for providing a (mandated) service to the Government. It would actually be those "certain customers" who are being subsidized by the government.

    Reply

  • adaminc

    adaminc

    March 10, 2015, 6:22 am

    Ontario gets almost all its power from Hydro and Nuclear. OPG has 76 power stations in Ontario, and only 5 of them are fossil fuels. 64 of them are Hydro, 3 are Nuclear and 3 are Wind, 2 are Solar and the last 2 are Biomass.

    3 of the Fossil Fuel plants are near Thunderbay, but the 2 biggest are south of Napanee on Lake Ontario which is the 2nd largest and the largest (also the largest in North America) is south of Hamilton on Lake Erie. It will be decommissioned as soon as some new nuclear plants are built to take over.

    This only makes up 70% of the energy used in Ontario, the rest comes from private corporations.

    I am pretty sure that BC is mostly hydro, so much so that they sell their surplus to California.

    Reply

  • Mitch_NZ

    Mitch_NZ

    March 11, 2015, 8:19 am

    Although I'm not from the States, from my visits there, and as a libertarian, I think that southern secession is probably the best option for every state in America to get what it wants. As long as the two new countries had no hostility, and people were free to immigrate between them, it would be a far better situation than what there is now.

    The southern states do have different values on average - it's a simple fact. I see no problem with them wanting to form a new union that reflects those values. I certainly wouldn't want to live there, but I do believe that allowing them to peacefully secede is a good idea.

    Reply

  • oconostota

    oconostota

    March 11, 2015, 6:33 am

    Relax dude. I came out very respectfully I thought on the subject of the man who rules your loyalty. I know that it sucks to have your hero not completely worshipped by others the same way you worship him but I never really knocked him. I just said he was not going to succeed in changing the US.

    Really as a republican all he is doing is giving more power to the neo-cons because so many republicans do not really know the difference between a ron paul and a john mccain. In fact if he (ron paul) goes much farther he is going to be removed and the machine of empire/globalization will continue. Remember he is an old man and making his death look like an accident won't be that hard. Won't be the first time either.

    Reply

  • BaconUpThatSausage

    BaconUpThatSausage

    March 10, 2015, 4:34 pm

    I'm reposting this from an earlier thread:

    One night I was babysitting a 2 y/o girl who was adopted from Russia. We were playing on her living room floor when she abruptly looked away from me, up and to her right. She stared into space for a few seconds and then smiled and said, "hi." Thinking she was just being a kid, I said, "hi," back to her, but she just looked back at me like, wtf? (clearly not talking to me) and then looked back to her right/up. She stared for another few seconds, and then looked back at me again, pointed to where she had been staring and said, "blood."

    Reply

  • JustinMcCoy

    JustinMcCoy

    March 10, 2015, 4:36 pm

    I agree with the kid in the video. I think that he has an easier time relating with people that have similar interests as they do. I don't think that just because a group of people listen to the same music it makes them in a gang. My friends and I are all into the same type of music but that doesn't necessarily mean that we will commit organized criminal activity. I realize that the police recognize them as a gang because they paint their face and have similar "hatchet-man" tattoos but I think that if the band didn't paint their face, this wouldn't be considered even close to resembling a gang.

    Reply

  • dbzer0

    dbzer0

    March 10, 2015, 4:18 pm

    >but I've never seen you support that claim in a way devoid of logical or observational errors.

    I haven't made any such errors.

    >We continually develop more advanced systems to deal with people's reputations inside of market places - I'm already capable of finding reliable vendors for much of everything I consume.

    This is absolutely irrelevant in dismantling the state or achieving the "opposite of the current state of affairs", not to mention wishful thinking based on simple advances in information spread which you extrapolate hundredfold.

    Reply

  • BuffaloBuffalo

    BuffaloBuffalo

    March 11, 2015, 2:01 am

    In software systems, I've found that what contributes **more** to a steep learning curve than simply the breadth and power of functionality is a combination of missing or unrefined documentation and an overly baroque design which is often awkward and confusing to begin using. Oh, and if the documentation is not top notch, then one hopes for generous and appropriate examples, which are usually paltry or much too diffucult for the learner, who is unfamiliar to the peculiarities of the system.

    Also, if one has to go to the source as a last resort, then this nearly always means taking away any hope of a gentle learning curve.

    Reply

  • Trogdor420

    Trogdor420

    March 11, 2015, 8:25 am

    To be honest, trial and error. Focusing is incredibly difficult, especially when shooting wide open, due to the razor thin depth of field. Generally, I put it on manual focus, get as close to the subject as the lens will allow, and rock back and forth to change the focal plane. I use burst on a 40D, allowing for almost 7 frames per second under optimal conditions. I usually manage to get at least a couple shots that are focussed on the part of the subject I am interested in. It takes a LOT of practice and can be pretty frustrating at times. Eventually, I would like to get focusing rails for my tripod so that I can have more precise control over my focusing.

    Reply

  • rsynnott

    rsynnott

    March 10, 2015, 10:08 am

    Didn't you steal that from Douglas Adams?

    > Nearby, a derelict spaceport contains a number of crumbling old spaceships, but one of which is still on power, "delayed" for over 900 years due to the non-arrival of its complement of lemon-soaked paper napkins.

    >Originally the bird people were ground dwellers, but gradually the planet was taken over by the shoe shops of the Dolmansaxlil Shoe Corporation, apparently thanks to the shoe shop intensifier ray deployed by the corporation in order to keep the populace buying more and more poorly made and ill-fitting shoes.

    Reply

  • grsmurf

    grsmurf

    March 10, 2015, 7:53 am

    Yeah !!

    What the Heck Were You Doing in Mississippi?

    Published on April, 27, 1999

    There are actually a lot of good things to say about Mississippi, and I don't mean just Elvis Presley, William Faulkner, and Eudora Welty. There are a lot of awfully nice people. There are the magnolias. There is the Reverend M.C. Thompson, Jr., pastor of the Mt. Nebo Missionary Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Mississippi -- a church that was burned by Klansmen in the summer of 1964 and then rebuilt -- whose singing could make anyone a Baptist. And there are the good race relations in the state, arguably among the best in the nation.

    I was in Mississippi for a brief part of Jesse Jackson's 8-day statewide bus tour. The service at Mt. Nebo was to commemorate the deaths of Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman, and James Chaney, the three young men (two white, one black) murdered that summer as they joined 1,000 students in trying to register blacks to vote.

    It is Reverend Jackson's view that it's no longer about race in Mississippi. The good people of that state get along just fine, for the most part. It’s about economics. And that affects both blacks and whites.

    **Did you know that Mississippi is last in education -- 49th or 50th** but that its powerful senator, Trent Lott, thwarts legislation that would help build and modernize Mississippi schools and fund more Mississippi teachers? That it's the poorest state in the nation, but that Senator Lott opposed the hike in the minimum wage from $4.25 to $5.15 and opposed hikes in the earned-income tax credit for the working poor? (Mississippi does have a spectacular new air conditioned ultra-modern prison in Yazoo City -- about the best prison facility money can buy -- so you can’t accuse the state's leaders of doing nothing for the people.) The good senator has every right to oppose these things and the Family Leave Act and all the rest. He has every right to associate with the white supremacist Council of Conservative Citizens (the CCC), a group that even the John Birch Society has disavowed, and to write articles for its newsletter. But it was Reverend Jackson's point that the good people of Mississippi have every right not to reelect him.

    Reply

  • topmojosun

    topmojosun

    March 10, 2015, 9:57 am

    Messages are always being sent and misread; it's human nature. Everyone assumes one thing, but never listen long enough to see that their assumptions are wrong. It really makes my stomach drop thinking about how many close-minded people there are that just start fighting over stupid stuff. I guess the message I'm sending with the flag depends on whether you came from a community that viewed it has bad or good. If you view it as bad, you must understand there's good in it, and conversely, viewing it as good requires you to understand that some people do view it as bad. There's a good and bad view in everything, the rebel flag just seems to polarize it the most.

    Reply

  • acrimonia

    acrimonia

    March 11, 2015, 6:23 am

    Wow, I didn't realize that if we had universal healthcare then people would never need to go to the emergency room. What an incredible bill!

    In all seriousness though, I am on the fence about the healthcare bill. I totally like the benefits of it, but I also understand the opposition, and I think it should go to a vote or something.

    Universal healthcare asks everyone to pay for the few. Most people who can afford healthcare get it, and they have to pay for it. This bill asks them to not only pay for themselves, but for everyone else as well. Is it not understandable that some people don't want to pay for other people when they are paying for themselves? Some people don't want to be forced to pay for insurance for bums and drug addicts who pay not taxes, do not work, and every time they feel the effects of their lifestyle in their body, these productive members of society must foot the bill.

    Healthcare reform also takes away incentive for businesses to give their employees health insurance. Why pay extra money for your employees' benefit, when they will get it for free? (also takes away incentive to get good jobs)

    The reason libertarians oppose the bill is because libertarans believe in personal responsibility. If I don't have healthcare, then I should go work hard and earn enough money to afford it. My health is my responsibility. Once the government takes responsibility, will they be able to tell us what we can and cant do with our bodies? I dont like that.

    Once again, I like the healthcare reform bill, but can anyone really address these ideas? I dont like comparisons to the army, police, roads, and infrastructure because these things are beneficial to everyone within the society. Healthcare only benefits those who can't pay for it.

    Reply

  • istara

    istara

    March 11, 2015, 9:09 am

    I had an idea (which may already be out there somewhere, and please let me know if it is) where you would make a list of things you liked, and things you hated. And the service could find out if there were like-minded or absolutely opposite-minded people across the globe.

    I know this is done for dating sites, and specific sites like music, but this wouldn't have any dating intent, and it would be much broader. Demographic information would be irrelevant.

    I basically wanted to find out if anyone else liked eg tiger, maple leaves, Concord, fireworks, sleeping but hated pavements, yellow, fir trees, Disney, large nostrils.

    Reply

  • Pilebsa

    Pilebsa

    March 10, 2015, 8:51 am

    OOP is more resource intensive, tends to encapsulate and insulate program functions and make things more difficult to debug. It results in more bloated, slower code 99% of the time. Linus Torvalds went on a big rant about how he was resisting using OOP in the Kernel for these and many more reasons. If you design a good system, you don't need OOP and you can make it faster and smaller. OOP's main value is to compensate for lazy programming. It's easier to rely on built-in constructors and destructors (which usually are overkill or offer false security) than to keep track of what's going on yourself.

    Reply

  • Naieve

    Naieve

    March 10, 2015, 9:21 am

    They declassified the 3 NIE's most often quoted when saying Bush lied. You can read right on them who they were distributed to, including the House and Senate Select Committees on Intelligence. Bipartisan Committees... If you want to read them, google it, you will find them in a pdf download. I don't have the links and don't feel like spending an hour looking.

    Ranking Democrats, including Pelosi, knew everything Bush knew when Bush knew it. They voted to give the President authority to go to war in Iraq anyways. If they had wanted to stop it, all they had to do was say "vote no". That's the whole fucking purpose of having these bipartisan committees... Specifically to ensure that Congress is informed of everything that is happening, and that both parties are kept in the loop.

    That of course is why Pelosi will never ever allow any investigation.

    Reply

  • Fimbulfamb

    Fimbulfamb

    March 10, 2015, 3:30 pm

    I haven't seen the film, but the misnomers are quite correct. Essentially what happened is this; Hrafna-Flóki came to Iceland (with his crows, used similarly to Moses'), but his harvest was destroyed by a harsh winter, and his livestock died, and he saw the ocean fill with ice boulders, and he decided to call this barren land 'Iceland'. Now, when Eiríkur rauði (Eirikur the red) went to Greenland, he *wanted* people to come there, so he called it something rather more alluring. He had apparently learned from his fellow settler's actions.

    Reply

  • efrique

    efrique

    March 10, 2015, 2:16 pm

    You think of a number before you open your envelope (that number will represent something like an a priori guess at the mean of the distribution of amounts inside, and you aren't quite operating totally in the dark here - after all, it's an amount that *fits in an evelope*).

    If the amount in your envelope is smaller than your guess, swap, otherwise don't.

    This strategy on average beats either pure "switch" or pure "don't switch". Ergo, it makes a difference what you pick. (There may well be a better strategy than this one)

    Reply

  • RobotBuddha

    RobotBuddha

    March 11, 2015, 4:06 am

    >6+ mo. homeless, living in car, working in office. WiFi and electricity.

    It's an odd experience, isn't it. I was kind of lucky in being a bit obsessed with technology before. So tons of ebooks, music, audio books, mobile internet, even a few solar batteries. In some ways just totally out of it, but in others just with the stuff in my backpack I was living a life a lot of people would consider enviable.

    I think a lot of people don't get that about the homeless. There's the traditional bearded smelly guy on the sidewalk. But it is possible to do while still blending in 100% with the people around you. Or I guess I was closer to 90%. But I still knew a lot of folks who had no idea that I didn't have a home.

    Reply

  • clerveu

    clerveu

    March 10, 2015, 1:22 pm

    I'm guessing this too. I grew up in a small central Minnesotan town (pop >900 in the 80s/90s) and this was par for the course at our catholic church's bizzares. Beer, pull tabs, pig races and an outdoor mass. What more can you ask for?

    I'm sure they could never get away with doing it now, but back in the 80's, at our annual mid-summer 4th of july style festival, they'd have a dude wrestle a bear on Saturday night. Then they blew up fireworks. Say what you will about their dogma, the catholic church knows how to throw a fucking party.

    Reply

  • kanagawa

    kanagawa

    March 10, 2015, 1:42 pm

    There's a very useful type of function that might help you understand, called "projection" functions. Basically they work like this:

    f(x[0],x[1],...,x[n]) = <x[0],x[1],...,x[n-1]>

    This takes something (like R^n) and transforms it into something else (like R^n-1) _but with less information_.

    When you want to go the other way:

    f(x[0],...,x[n-1]) = <x[0],...,x[n-1],y>

    Well, you have to choose y somehow. When you choose y, you are putting new information into the system via the function f.

    One way to imagine this is to think of R^2 as a big sheet of paper. Then, consider how you might "crumple" the paper up into a ball. When you crumple it up, the paper "goes 3-d," right? It's no longer "flat" in the sense that it originally was. And, the crumpling means that you have to describe the location of each point on the surface in a new way-- you have to add a third axis to accurately describe the "crumpled" version.

    Reply

  • Nougat

    Nougat

    March 10, 2015, 10:26 am

    I have to think back quite a ways, but I think I have a couple.

    "Take a fucking swing, Bucky Beaver. *Please.*" That was to a guy I worked with, who had a little overbite, during work. I was under the impression that if he took the first swing, anything I did in response would be legally justifiable. I begged him, but he didn't swing.

    "Hey, that's my *wife!*" Wife and I were at a college party at her sister's place downstate a few years back. We were really too old to be there, but we were having a decent time. Party was big, and there were people rolling through that nobody knew. Some dude, on his way out the front door, slapped my wife on the ass *hard* as he walked by. I leapt up from the couch, grabbed him by the elbow, and dragged him back into the house. His buddy stopped and came with. "Hey!" I said. He started getting all "What the fuck," like he was gonna fight me. "That's my *wife!*" My wife tapped my shoulder and "pulled me off," and the guy got super apologetic.

    This other guy was tall, young, strong - everything I'm not. I can't even imagine what the look on my face was, because he turned from wanting to kick my ass to just wanting to get the hell out of there real quick.

    Reply

  • tobyflorida

    tobyflorida

    March 10, 2015, 12:03 pm

    how did you get banned from the park hyatt hotel in chicago? (you casually mentioned this in one of your answers.)

    is that the hotel you got locked out of your room in? butt naked and drunk/high? please tell this story.

    i would also like to ask if you are co-dependent, since you spent a lot of money on friends. do you feel these people are really friends, and do you hold it against them that they let you spend all of this money you didn't have?

    how much of the money spent was cash, and how much of it was debt?

    did the mania stop when you couldn't get debt anymore?

    the car you bought and returned 2 months later, what kind of car was it?

    Reply

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